top of page
IMG_2672.jpeg

Pupa

27FC2068-BC4B-4773-9EF3-7F5278292AE6.jpeg

Zebra-Kite Swallowtail (N. marcellus)

70930792956__21FB8216-3BD9-4D07-87CD-E7CEF382EF2E.jpeg

1st instar larva

723DB0AE-5C2B-441F-AFEE-10A1DB9FBCCD.jpeg

5th instar larva

Description: Wingspan can range from 6.4-10.4 cm, long "kite" tails, dorsal side has long black stripes with 2                                 small red dots in the middle, ventral side has more muted, smaller stripes with a red line going                                   down the middle.

Habitat: lives mainly in woods, riversides, primarily with pawpaw trees nearby

Host Plant(s): Pawpaw

Range/Frequency: Zebra Swallowtails have been most spotted in Lancaster, Dauphin, Fayette, York, and Lebanon                                  county in the months of April, June, July, and August. They are most common in Pennsylvania                                    overall from April to August.

30E8E824-2120-4FCB-B7A7-1E3807712993.jpeg

Pupa

BE32D705-387A-47BE-9F8D-A457B5480C2E.jpeg

Giant Swallowtail (H. cresphontes)

IMG-4822.jpg

Larvae

Description: Male wingspan ranges from 15-19 cm, females range from 14-18 cm. Females are usually bigger than                        males, though. Biggest butterfly in North America, very easy to identify in PA.

Habitat: lives mainly in woodlands, orchards, and meadows

Host Plant(s): Citrus, Rue, Prickly Ash, Lemon

Range/Frequency: Giant Swallowtails have been seen in lots of counties, the most common sightings being in                                        Centre, Pike, York, Montgomery, Wayne, Susquehanna, Lancaster, and Butler County. Giant                                        Swallowtails are most commonly seen during August and parts of July and September.

unnamed (9).jpg
IMG_3751.jpg

Final-Instar larva

Black Swallowtail (P. polyxenes)

BST_EGG_IMG-1.jpg

            Eggs

BST_CAT_IMG.jpg

Early-Instar Larva

Description: Big black wings on dorsal side, males have a yellow band that runs through their wings, females have                        bright blue with red spots on their hindwings, wingspan 8-11 cm

Habitat: open fields, suburbs, roadsides, deserts, marshes

Host Plant(s): Rue, Parsley, Dill, Fennel, Carrot, Queen Anne's Lace, Golden Alexanders

 

Range/Frequency: Black Swallowtails have been seen in lots of counties, the most common sightings being in                                        Montgomery, Chester, Bucks, and Lycoming County. They fly from May to August/September.

NO PHOTO AVAILABLE

Palamedes Swallowtail (P. palamedes)

Description: Big black wings on dorsal side with a big yellow band running through, ventral side with almost the                            same thing but blue spots as well, wingspan 11.4-13cm

Habitat: wet woods, near rivers, swamp forests

Host Plant(s): Sassafras, Red bay

 

Range/Frequency: There has only ever been one Palamedes Swallowtail sighting in PA, in Berks County. It does                                       not breed here and should be considered a very rare stray.

IMG-7611.jpg

3rd and 4th instar Larvae

85CCE199-57E7-4C66-990A-A07A12B281FE.jpeg

Pipevine Swallowtail (B. philenor)

PVST_EGG_IMG-1.jpg

Eggs

Description: Big black wings on dorsal side with iridescent blue on the hindwing. Wingspan 7-13 cm.

Habitat: open areas such as woodland edges

Host Plant(s): Wooly Pipevine (A. tomentosa) and Dutchman's Pipe (A. macrophylla)

 

Range/Frequency: Pipevine Swallowtails have been most commonly spotted in Philadelphia, Adams, Franklin,                                        Chester, Centre, Juanita, and Bucks County. They fly from June to September.

67959814160__B29AAAF1-1B4C-4867-8ECD-8B4646336D15_edited.jpg

Spicebush Swallowtail (P. troilus)

Description: Big black wings on dorsal side with iridescent blue on the hindwing. Sometime called Green-                                      Clouded Swallowtail. Wingspan 7.5-10 cm.

Habitat: woods, fields, roadsides, swamps, parks

Host Plant(s): Spicebush and Sassafras

 

Range/Frequency: Spicebush Swallowtails have been most commonly spotted in Centre, Chester, Butler, Monroe,                                   Northampton, and Lycoming County. They fly from May to September.

87494539-D597-4D02-8D31-B2830AA55220.jpeg
2B4C5E5C-B49F-46D9-AA4F-1573C22EF8DC.jpeg

Pupa

Tiger Swallowtail (P. glaucas)

Description: Yellow wings with black and blue bands on the top and bottom of the wings. Dark form is all-black                            with blue bands at the bottom of hindwing. Wingspan 6.2-11.4 cm

Habitat: open areas such as wood/forest edges

Host Plant(s): Magnolias, Tulip Trees, Black Cherry Trees

 

Range/Frequency: Tiger Swallowtails have been most spotted in Centre, Montgomery, Chester, Bucks, Delaware,                                   and Butler county. They fly from May to September, but you may find some early-wakers if the                                   weather is warm enough in March and April.

bottom of page